The Four P’s of Hog Control

We use a simple equation (people + process + product = performance) to understand, manage and improve Integrated Wild Pig Control® (IWPC®) results. Trained people must execute an effective work process using efficient products capable of achieving the stated performance standard. The term “effective” measures the degree to which the desired result is produced and “efficient” measures maximum productivity with minimum waste, expense or effort.

1. Performance

JAGER PRO PerformancePerformance must be measurable and quantifiable since it determines whether the mission, goal or objective is being met. The performance standard must be established first because all variables are measured from the mission’s success or failure. For example, our IWPC® performance standard of “100% removal of the entire sounder spending the least amount of fuel, time and labor” is measurable and quantifiable. Mission failure can be isolated to either untrained people, an ineffective process, an inefficient product or a combination of these variables. Land managers making performance-based decisions can implement the needed changes necessary to accomplish the mission.

Performance measures can be grouped into at least six categories which are listed below with their definitions. The best performance standards are written to accomplish multiple categories at once and are focused to improve the people, process and products working together.

Effective- Measures the degree to which the desired result is produced.
Efficient- Measures maximum productivity with minimum waste, expense or effort.
Quality- Standard of something as measured against other things of a similar kind.
Timely- Measures whether a unit of work was performed in a favorable time.
Productive- Value added by the process divided by the labor and capital spent.
Safe- Measures the overall exposure to danger or risk.

2. People

JAGER PRO PeoplePeople (i.e. farmer, wildlife biologist, land manager, Hog Control Operator™, etc.) are the most important part of a successful hog control equation. They must be properly trained to implement an effective work process and operate efficient products. A helicopter is merely an expensive aircraft incapable of flight without a properly trained pilot to fly it. A thermal rifle scope is only an expensive night optic without a properly trained marksman to aim it. A corral trap is just an expensive metal contraption without a properly trained professional to build it in the correct location and trigger the gate closed at the correct time. People are also responsible for the leadership task of selecting the appropriate control processes and products to implement in the correct sequence based on seasonal food sources.

3. Process

JAGER PRO ProcessThe process (i.e. trapping, night shooting, aerial gunning, snaring, etc.) is the method or strategy defined as a series of actions or steps taken to achieve the performance standard. Optimizing the process increases efficiency, increases effectiveness, improves quality, timeliness and productivity while it eliminates waste and reduces risk. Land managers should focus their attention on specific processes which achieve the most effective results. Innovative hog control processes or methods are cyclical and should be implemented in a specific sequence based on seasonal food sources. A “trapping” process will be more efficient during winter months and a “night shooting” process will be more efficient during spring planting or fall harvest months.

4. Product

JAGER PRO Verizon MINE CameraThe product (i.e. thermal rifle scope, cellular camera, corral trap, etc.) is the physical object, invention, machine or technology used to perform the control process. Land managers should focus their attention on specific products which achieve the most efficient results. Hog control products are also cyclical and should be utilized in the correct sequence based on seasonal food sources. When “100% removal of the entire sounder spending the least amount of fuel, time and labor” is the stated performance standard, then a semi-automatic rifle with a 20-round magazine is a more efficient product than shooting a bolt action rifle. A 35’ diameter corral trap is more efficient than a 5’ x 10’ portable box trap. An 8’ gate threshold is more efficient than a narrow 3’ wide continuous catch door. An automatic feeder is more efficient than pouring bait from a bucket. A cellular remote control gate trigger is a more efficient product than a traditional trip wire.

BENEFITS OF MEASURING PERFORMANCE

Land managers cannot manage what they do not measure. Measuring performance standards is a continuous cycle which allows new training opportunities for people as more efficient methods and technologies are invented. Leaders should be constantly optimizing their process and products to improve mission success.

Listed below are the eight most important benefits of measuring performance standards:

1. Ensures decisions are based on facts instead of emotions. Are decisions based upon documented field data? Or intuition and feelings?

2. Identifies whether the mission is being accomplished. What level are we operating? What was the actual kill or capture percentage last week? Last month? Last quarter? Last year?

3. Identifies whether people are qualified and trained. Are personnel capable of accomplishing the performance standard? Do they know how to effectively implement the processes and operate the products?

4. Identifies whether the process or method is effective. Is the process or method capable of accomplishing the 100% kill or capture performance standard? What are the problems and solutions?

5. Identifies whether the product or technology is efficient. Is the product or technology capable of accomplishing the 100% kill or capture performance standard? What are the problems and solutions?

6. Identifies problems that bias, bureaucracy and emotions cover up. Some organizations have been performing a hog control mission for a long time without a quantifiable or measurable performance standard and incorrectly believe their people, process and products are good enough.

7. Identifies where improvements need to be made. What can we do better? How can we improve?

8. Identifies if improvements were effectively implemented. Did we improve from the last assessment?

Jager Pro Measuring IWPC Success

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